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Poster: light into ashes Date: Dec 27, 2009 8:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: 3-21-70 review

After wandering in the darkness for a while, Noah Weiner has finally written about 3-21-70 in his blog - one of the most magical shows of 1970:

http://deadlistening.blogspot.com/2009/12/1970-march-21-capitol-theater.html

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 29, 2009 6:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

The thing that always impressed me about the Capitol Theater runs was the Dead's willingness to go off script.

I had the honor of seeing all of their Fillmore East shows and all of the Capitol shows and the different gestalts underscore the amazing diversity of the band in 1970. The Fillmore East shows were bread and butter. Generally, they showcased the "new" tunes and peaked with either a Star or an Other One. No complaints, mind you--these sets were always magic.

But an hour "uptown" in the Westchester 'burbs, the band encountered the other half of the New York Dead scene. Not many people in Manhattan were aware of the Portchester mirror, so the audience was significantly different. For some reason, the band chose to give this half of the New York base something completely different. Perhaps they felt more comfortable here--less obligated to play to the expectations of the Fillmore East crowd with its coterie of music reporters and national networking. Perhaps they just felt that the Capitol radiated a different energy. Who knows?

You just don't see set lists like these from March and November. Even their last appearances in March 1971 are unique in that they chose that run (interesting that their first real east coast 6 night "run" was here) to premiere a dozen new songs and covers--more new material than at almost any other time.

As to the Pig material: post 1968/9 many of his best songs were played only a few times a year (Smokestack Lightning was held to twice a year). New covers such as It's a Man's World and Hard to Handle became more common for a time and the rave ups were limited to Lovelight. The last Midnight Hour--4-29-71--is rather kickass.

This post was modified by ghostofpig on 2009-12-29 14:54:32

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Dec 28, 2009 7:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

I wonder what it was about the Capitol? From 3/21/70 through the rest of the year, the shows are exceptional - the Dead must have known they were doing special shows at Port Chester. (Of course, the Fillmore East shows are especially awesome as well, but as you mention, not as adventurous.)
I wish they'd done the December shows that were scheduled at the Capitol.... A lot of the vibe was gone by Feb '71, somewhere in-between the setlist overhaul & Mickey Hart slipping out & Dark Star going AWOL.

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Poster: deadpolitics Date: Jan 25, 2010 12:50am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

There must have been something special about that venue as they chose it for the dream experiment the band was involved in during the 2/71 run!

You don't just try that anywhere, right?

http://www.forteantimes.com/features/articles/169/the_grateful_deads_acid_test_for_esp.html

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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Dec 28, 2009 7:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

I always thought the Dark Star>Wharf Rat>Beautiful Jam>Dark Star>MAMU to end the first set of 2-18-71 was pretty adventurous. Perhaps your right about the rest of the run which would point as much to adjusting to the loss of Mickey as the new material.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Dec 29, 2009 1:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

My comment was a bit lazy - that is a nice Dark Star on the 18th - with the Wharf Rat in the middle it hints at new directions. And then they dropped it til April.
At the Fillmore East & Port Chester 4-night runs in late '70, they rotated setlists a bit, giving us 2 Stars in each run....but I'm not thinking of this song alone. The 6-night run in Feb '71 seems to have taxed their inventiveness as they played much the same songs almost every night. It's also notable that St Stephen was only played in that first 2/18 show, and Dancing in the Streets & Alligator/Caution were totally avoided.

To make a statistical comparison - at the November '70 Port Chester shows they played about 50 different songs in 4 shows - at the Fillmore East in Sep '70, about 45 songs in 4 shows - at El Monte in Dec '70, 35 songs in 3 shows - and in Feb '71, with all those new songs added, only about 40 songs in 6 shows! (And after that, 40 songs in 3 shows at the Manhattan Center run that April - and about 45 [non-Beach Boys] songs in 4 shows at the Fillmore East.)
Anyway, the point of all these dull numbers is just that, for all the new songs, their shows took a big drop in adventurousness in early '71....but then, we don't need a chart to know that....

Actually Marty Weinberg, who taped all these NY runs, had a few words on the Feb '71 shows:
"Those were pretty good shows, but they were not the same as the shows in November... I remember Jerry coming out the second night and saying, 'I don't think Mickey is going to be here tonight, it's pretty weird.'.... They were a lot less powerful as a band, it was something missing once he wasn't there.... That was a real turning point. Afterwards they were a lot tighter, but less frivolous...less experimental, less willing to go out there, to get out on a limb. They were much more repeatable after that for the shows I saw...they became much more night-for-night predictable."

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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Dec 29, 2009 6:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Not lazy at all and my nature is to use numbers and charts to prove a point so I appreciate the effort. I actually agreed with your initial comment but was just really trying to emphasize that the loss of Mickey might have been a bigger factor than was appreciated. I do think there is one other factor that hasn't been mentioned. The new songs that were introduced in the Feb run were not going to be released as a studio album and that these shows were essentially the rehearsals for what would ultimately become Skull and Roses. So it wasn't simply the nature of the new material but what was being planned for it that resulted in the more predictable sets. Seems like they repeated this approach in October '71 when not only did they add Keith but they introduced 6 or 7 new songs in one show. I haven't looked it up but I suspect that more new material was introduced in '71 than any other year. I guess at some level moving forward with such significant amounts of new material was also being adventurous on a different level.

It probably also allows someone like WT to define the outer limits of the era that he listens to although I still think that "his" era really ends in London in May '72. To me the next big change in the band was the loss of Pig and the jazzier direction the band started moving in the summer and fall of '72 exemplified by the approach to tunes like Bird Song.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Dec 29, 2009 10:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Hey L--surprised you and the math tutor didn't chime in above (it was 12-29, right?), and yeah, I have often wondered "what's up?" with my era ending date (like all of you...well, some of you?...hmmm...one of you when forced to? Maybe none of you care when I start and stop?) and this seemed to be a rather specific event to signify a change in 71, and then add in Keith, drop out PP (recall he doesn't do much for me, so I am usu focusing on the others to start), and Donna, and by the end of 71 there really has been a change.

But, you are right, I can often listen to anything through Spring of 72, and the real clencher that YOU have it right is that I found the Winterland Boxed Set of Nov 73 to be a real disappointment (ie, by "then" something has changed for me).

For all of DanHealy's comments (you know, I kinda like the guy now...I really think it was either Rob or LiA trying to get me to refocus on musical posts...it sorta worked, huh? I still think MissD is the cutest poster around, and appreciate that your missus, indirectly, stepped forward to defend me) it is sort of bizarre that "we" (me anyhow) spend so much time discussing my limitations round here...

Hope the Holidays and publish or perish academy are treating you right, Larry.

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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Dec 29, 2009 2:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Thank you Mr. Tell and here's to a happy and healthy new year to you and yours. Have fun with the new pup. We picked one up in September (aussie shep rescued from less than optimal living conditions, just ask his 90 relatives that were also looking for new homes) and while he requires a little more attention than we had grown accustomed to with our other dog, he is well worth it. He also seems to enjoy the early era as I was listening to a show from late '69 a few weeks ago and it seemed to keep him calm. Music soothes the savage beast or something like that.

As for the math tutor, you do recall correctly that my son's old algebra tutor did hear me listening to a show one night and started asking about 12-29-68. He actually had an original poster from the Miami Pop Festival in his house but had never heard the show. I burned him a copy as well as several other early era shows and he preferred 10-12-68 to TDIH. I tend to agree with him, although I did sample some of 12-29 during a dog walk today.

Publish or perish is treating me well these days. I really have no complaints. Heck I found out just today that I received a small grant from a private foundation. Unofficial so I can't comment much further but still a nice way to finish out the year.

Yes I am covering many topics. I am on the road still as we loaded up the family and one dog and headed back to the Philly/NJ area for the holidays. Internet time has been limited. Gotta a love a dog who can do an 800 mile one trip in a minivan with 3 kids and 2 adults and wag his tail the whole way.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 29, 2009 6:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

A few notes about Feb 71 at the Capitol. First, they were recording for a new live l.p., and they were placing emphasis on the new songs. Thus, they played a good many of these songs over and over again in order to break them in and capture versions for Skullfuck. Of course, Jerry's decision to record his solo l.p. took four of these songs off the table, and a few others didn't mature for a while.
Still, take H to H as an example. Listen to the song as it develops between the beginning of the year until 4-29-71, when it peaks (regardless of 8-06). Clearly, they were improving on it nightly in an attempt to get it right! (Sadly, it was omitted from Skullfuck.) Nothing was used from Portchester as the various songs were being played better by the time of the Manhattan Theater/Fillmore East shows.

Still, they chose the Capitol to unveil six new songs. These were played for the most part nightly over the 6 day run. The shows tended to end with a NFA--GTDTRFB--(NFA or Lovelight) sequence which they wanted to end the l.p. with.

So, yes, winter spring 1971 gets very repetitive, but they were recording, just as they were in Feb--March 1969. Yes, they were probably thrown off their game by the loss of Mickey. But they managed to pull off some very nice hows.

As to Portchester and the magic: obviously the place gave off a certain vibe to the band. Up until Feb of 1971, you won't find a run of six shows anywhere. Portchster was kind of New York's secret sanctum--as compared with the international notoriety of the Fillmore East. Sure, the hardcore heads went to both places (easy transport via train or car), but the suburban vibe was different. Less pressure, less bullshit. The Capitol hosted many of rock's royal acts including Janis and Pink Floyd. In 1997, the Rolling Stones did a secret show there for MTV.

It was a great place, a theaer not unlike the Fillmore East or later the Academy of Music (the Palladium) and others. It had that great "hippie" ambience. Old but stately, wooden, smoke friendly, cheap. Every trip out there was worth it. Besides, I always crashed at the house of the finest cook in all of Westchester County!

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Dec 29, 2009 12:26pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Aha, ghost & elbow - I'd completely overlooked that the Dead were recording these shows in multitrack for the album. It definitely explains the setlist repetitiousness, and to some extent (knowing that the Dead would often "play safe" when recording) the lack of many November-type excursions & the dropping of several 1970 staples.
As it turned out, they were wise to go with April for the album! (Actually, it might have turned out even better if they'd waited longer & included August as well.) It is strange that they'd tape these breakout shows for consideration, knowing how much smoother the songs would get within a few months.

Like Marty, I get disappointed with these song-oriented shows, remembering how they'd been in November '70. Of course, numbers of songs alone are not that important - 1968/69 lovers can attest to the power of a repeated ten-song setlist! (Of course, most of those songs were 10-20 minutes....)
1971 did see more songs added than any other year. The other big breakout shows of the early years were 10/19/71 and 2/9/73 - and it's telling to see the differences. In October '71, the shows weren't that jam-oriented yet (esp with Pigpen out of the picture), but they still gave us four Dark Stars in the first three weeks of the tour, and the Other One was quickly turning into a monster with Keith - clearly new possibilities were opening up, and Europe '72 was the result. And in Feb '73, they didn't forsake the big jams at all, they just made the shows longer to fit in everything!

You mention how Hard to Handle improved - they'd been working at it since mid-'69! (To some extent, it replaced Easy Wind, which became a rarity - while Schoolgirl and Man's World disappeared.) To me, the big success story of early '71 is Good Lovin' - this song had seen some great jams in 1970, and late in the year Pigpen started adding raps to it, which spun it in a new direction. It's a highlight of many early '71 shows, and by April we get some really awesome versions....

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 30, 2009 6:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Indeedee. I think they ran tape at the Capitol to take no chances. The first time they started a live project in 1969, they lost the first gig(s) due to tape errors. Also, they would likely want to hear the new songs in 16 track glory to work on them.

H to H was introduced in 1969-with Jerry on pedal steel (yikes!) and sounded great by 2-14-70 (Bear's Choice). But--as with Easy Wind, which tended to ramble live, they gave Bobby a lead slot. That began in 1971. This needed to be worked on.

Between the Capitol shows and the Manhattan shows in April lies somewhat of a wasteland in terms of performance. The college gigs don't do much--neither tight nor jammy. But they got on a roll at the Manhattan Theater that they carried into the Fillmore East.

Odd thing about the Fillmore East shows--they don't showcase the new tunes. Instead, they spread them across the five nights without much repetition. In fact (I believe) the only song played each night was Hard to Handle. I think it's a great study to take listen to each night's version and hear it develop into the monster from 4-29 (this isn't a debate about 8-06). Each night becomes tighter and fiercer until it all congeals on the final night.

I feel that the lack of jamming is due to the lack of a keyboardist and the missing Mickey Hart's--as well as a desire to perform the new material. More the former than the latter. What was performed seems relatively formulaic--save for the Good Lovin' (sans rap) of 4-26 and its fully articulated counterpart Alligator jam on 4-29.


Still, I think that the Capitol was honored by having all those new tunes premiered there. Perhaps this is merely an accident--the shows postponed from 1970 were perhaps rescheduled for these dates. But for them to hold court for six nights with two fists full of new material--that's not something you toss away in Peoria.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Dec 30, 2009 2:04pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Fillmore Setlists

Good points.
The March '71 shows seem in general, spotty or bland (with a couple exceptions) - by April they've put more pep in their step and there are a number of fine shows - not much exploration usually, but solid. At the Fillmore run, seems like they're able to pull out new surprises each night. (Later on, I think the 5/29, 7/2 and 7/31 shows get closer to the tight August '71 standard.)
I don't think the Fillmore shows are all quite so formulaic - all those guest appearances are unusual (if not always satisfying) - Dark Star>St Stephen was quite a rarity by then - the Good Lovin' from the 25th is my own favorite (might be a formula, but it's a winning one). Otherwise, yes, very song-oriented. And you're right, the new songs don't get special treatment.

I'm not sure about the lack of jamming being due to change of personnel....after all they'd done fine in 1970 with no keyboardist; and after Mickey left they continued with, for example, Good Lovin' and the Other One with those long drum solos. (They even did one Alligator!)

Just a note about the Fillmore East setlists...they played about 45 songs in all - four were repeated on each night (Sugar Magnolia of course, Hard to Handle, Playing, and Loser).
Eight were repeated on four nights - China>Rider, Casey Jones, Truckin, Bertha, Bobby McGee, GDTRFB, and BIODTL.
Seven were repeated on three nights - Morning Dew, Sing Me Back Home, Not Fade Away, Uncle John, Cumberland, and Bird Song.
Ten songs were played twice - Dark Star, Good Loving, Ripple, Second That Emotion, Deal, Johnny B Goode, Hurts Me Too, Next Time, The Rub, Cold Rain.
What's interesting is some of the songs they played just once in five nights - hard to believe there was just one Other One, one Lovelight, one Wharf Rat, etc...
(I did this in a hurry, so there may be some inaccuracies...)

Sugar Magnolia 25,26,27,28,29
Loser 25,26,27,28,29
Playing 25,26,27,28,29
Hard to Handle 25,26,27,28,29
China>Rider 25,26,27,29
Casey Jones 25,26,27,29
BIODTL 25,26,28,29
Truckin' 25,26,28,29
Bertha 25,27,28,29
Bobby McGee 25,27,28,29
Morning Dew 25,28,29
Sing Me Back Home 25,26,27
Not Fade Away 25,26,28
(GDTRFB also done 29th)
Uncle John 25,27,29
Cumberland 27,28,29
M&MU 27,28,29
Bird Song 27,28,29
Next Time 25,27
Cold Rain 25,29
The Rub 25,28
Second That Emotion 25,29
Good Lovin 25,26
Dark Star 26,28
Hurts Me Too 26,29
Deal 27,28
JBGoode 27,29
Ripple 28,29
Friend of the Devil 25
Big Boss Man 26
Wharf Rat 26
Mama Tried 27
Dire Wolf 27
Lovelight 27
King Bee 28
El Paso 28
Other One 28
St Stephen 28
Dark Hollow 29
Minglewood 29
Black Peter 29
Alligator 29
Greatest Story 29
Midnight Hour 29
Bid You Goodnight 29

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 30, 2009 5:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Fillmore Setlists

I didn't mean to imply that the FE shows were repetitive or dull. I found it curious that the new songs weren't at the forefront. I was at both full runs--and the Manhattan Center shows--and frankly loved every minute. The fact that the new songs were new was great--and they are great songs. I enjoyed the relatively rare one offs at the Capitol--especially some of Pig's tunes--Smokestack, etc. I really enjoyed the Manhattan shows due to the energy the band got from the overcrowded room full of heads. The FE shows were magical, each night in its own way. I'm glad they played HtH each night, but I'm also glad that they did keep the set lists fresh. And I will never forget 4-29. That's in my top five shows (I saw perhaps 40 between 1967 and 1972) due in large measure to the Alligator jam and the amazing Cold Rain and Snow coda as well as the Midnight Hour which is my all time favorite (as was that night's H2H).

During this period, the band did back off the deep jamming, but I'd seen many great Stars, Other Ones, Cautions, etc., and was not disappointed by the change in approach. When they did jam, it was still excellent.

Every band morphs as they age, and the GD, still quite young, were aging gracefully. I'm glad they continued to morph with the addition of Keith, who gave Jerry something new to feed off of. By the time of the Academy of Music run in March, they were a new machine, gearing up for Europe. When they came back--whew!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Dec 29, 2009 5:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Actually Marty Weinberg, who taped all these NY runs, had a few words on the Feb '71 shows:

"Those were pretty good shows, but they were not the same as the shows in November... I remember Jerry coming out the second night and saying, 'I don't think Mickey is going to be here tonight, it's pretty weird.'.... They were a lot less powerful as a band, it was something missing once he wasn't there.... That was a real turning point. Afterwards they were a lot tighter, but less frivolous...less experimental, less willing to go out there, to get out on a limb. They were much more repeatable after that for the shows I saw...they became much more night-for-night predictable."

LiA: this is a critical point for me...I do enjoy post Jan 71 material (rarely going beyond about Dec, 71), and I appreciate those that say "they were better with just Billy" (in a way, obviously, those that pick 72-73 as the peak are acknowledging that Billy alone was good enough, and Keith was more than adequate [putting it in those terms to accent that even if you think it was that Jerry alone peaked, those two points must also be true...right?]).

But, for me, whether it was the shift due to Hart's absence, the addition of Keith, the "non band" issues ($, loss of innocence, shift to new musical explorations, etc), or who knows what, I often think that my focus on the early era is in part driven by what the band did with Hart, TC, and PP, relative to what they did with only Billy and Keith, and it may be as simple as what is outlined above ("predictability" vs "who knows what") even though it's not as simple as that sounds (as we have discussed many times, "my" set lists are really pretty consistent so it's more than that...).

Anyhow, babbling here, but never have been able to confidently ascribe my bias to anything besides the "energy" (and to a lesser extent,"singing/songwriting" prowess of 70 with acoustic shows); these comments suggest another organic basis for my interest.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 30, 2009 7:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

I agree wholeheartedly with WT. Or maybe with Marty, whom I knew pretty well back then. The retreat from the jams and the cliff leaping was disappointing. But the previous two l.p.s were loaded with great SONGS. And the new stuff from Feb 1971--great as well. Constanten leaves, the band plays on, Mickey leaves, the band plays on.

But in the context of the first half of 1971, the Capitol run had its share of magic and then some. Not the jammy whammy magic--but the great song magic.

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Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Dec 28, 2009 4:57am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Thanks for pointing this out! I have always been a huge fan of the early show on this night and I enjoyed reading Noah's eloquent description of what is certainly one of my very favorite performances of Viola's...

"And then comes the triumph of the early show: He Was A Friend Of Mine > Viola Lee Blues > The Seven > Cumberland Blues. He Was A Friend Of Mine is so lovely. The main lead break finds Jerry exploring something that sounds quite unique to the time period. His lilting, melodic solo isn’t really Dark Star-like; nor is it Morning Dew-like. It's really more like an intense Dancin' In The Streets groove slowed down to a ballad's pace. In this setting it rotates and soars gracefully, as soft as a flower opening in the morning sun. It’s sad to think where this song could have gone if they kept it around. But this was the last one ever. At least they give it a fitting farewell.

The tune comes to its natural end, and is immediately followed by the explosive intro of Viola Lee Blues, the full power of Phil bass exploding with great gouts of magma. 1970 Viola Lee’s tended to go at a tad slower tempo than previous years, and this rendition takes a bit of time to get the jam flying. Eventually, though, they are in high gear. While the jam is intensifying, they actually take an energy detour and mellow a bit. The drumming quiets slightly, and things get a bit ethereal, leaving the slow churn of Viola Lee behind. The music enters a loose bluesy gait for a bit before finding its footing back on the road to meltdown. The diversion adds a nice twist to the song, creating some curious variation to what is normally a non-stop uphill climb in energy.

Soon enough they are building again, and eventually reach that searing, scorching precipice that only Viola Lee could reach. Pure electric meltdown. The rush of mayhem is as blinding as it is infinitely revealing. Wind takes on the form of boulders as they continually explode and race across the stage. Utterly lost in a timeless wormhole, the band stops on a dime that seems to lurch forward, back into the original tempo of Viola Lee. Garcia’s solo out of the song’s re-immergence starts with some guttural, bluesy moans. Then he goes into fluttering triplet pull-offs for a while, and the band is swirling, not headed toward the last verse at all. This is a wonderful "musical satori" moment where the music is wanting for nothing, happy to simply be with nothing but itself being perceived.

But there’s a destination after all—the all too few times played Seven jam. The theme sounds like something of an Eric Clapton riff straight out of a song by Cream, only the jam has its own spin such that if Eric Clapton were in attendance he might have melted into the floor. Phil is rolling. Jerry is absolutely flying. The only trouble is it's far too short. That said, the transition it offers into Cumberland Blues is a piece of priceless 1970 segue jamming. Just as we are completely at the mercy of The Seven jam, thinking about Eric Clapton in a technicolor puddle on the floor, the Dead bring us lusciously into psychedelic bluegrass.

Pairing Viola Lee Blues and Cumberland this close together is about all the evidence we need to support one of my long held beliefs that at a core level the two songs draw from the exact same thematic undercurrent of inspiration. Throughout Cumberland it is easy to imagine Viola Lee bursting back out at any time. The Grateful Dead seem to be evolving before our ears here as the unmistakable nuisances of the past and future come together."

http://www.archive.org/details/gd70-03-21.early.lee.pcrp.20184.sbeok.shnf

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Dec 28, 2009 6:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

I agree with Cliff fully: I have always felt that the thematic undertones of Cumberland Blues come directly from Viola Lee. They could easily have done a Viola--Cumberland--Viola without breaking a sweat.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Dec 28, 2009 7:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

The Dead probably felt the same way, since the last Viola Lee on 10-31-70 also goes into Cumberland....

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Dec 28, 2009 1:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

thanks for pointing that review out. I'm glad to know I'm not the only one here that thinks that 3/21/70 is just an amazing show!

Noah is a very cool guy and I love his blog. I never met him, but one time we talked on line over ten years ago and he was cool enough to send me cassette copies of 5/14/70, which at the time had just began to circulate... on a vine I believe....(and 11/6/70, 11/8/70 from Marty Weinberg's masters I believe)

I like the title of his review, a Jerry quote from the show:

"Calm Down You Unruly Freaks!"

I like when Sam Cutler comes out before the encore saying over and over again to the audience what an incredible set the Grateful Dead had just played!

"Incredible!!
An incredible, incredible set by The Grateful Dead....stand by" says Sam Cutler, new road manager for the Grateful Dead, on 3/21/70. Sam Cutler, a man who had just left the employ of The Rolling Stones (who were rock and roll Royalty at the time), to join a heathen road circus called The Grateful Dead at that time. Must have been a real trip for Cutler. Heavy changes.

The band comes out and does "We Bid You Goodnight."

You know it's been a GREAT NIGHT!

thanks for pointing that review out. I'm glad to know I'm not the only one here that thinks that 3/21/70 is just an amazing show!

Noah is a very cool guy and I love his blog. I never met him, but one time we talked on line over ten years ago and he was cool enough to send me cassette copies of 5/14/70, which at the time had just began to circulate... on a vine I believe....(and 11/6/70, 11/8/70 from Marty Weinberg's masters I believe)

I like the title of his review, a Jerry quote from the show:

"Calm Down You Unruly Freaks!"

I like when Sam Cutler comes out before the encore saying over and over again to the audience what an incredible set the Grateful Dead had just played!

"Incredible! An incredible, incredible set by The Grateful Dead....stand by" says Sam Cutler, new road manager for the Grateful Dead, on 3/21/70. Sam Cutler, a man who had just left the employ of The Rolling Stones (who were rock and roll Royalty at the time), to join a heathen road circus called The Grateful Dead at that time. Must have been a real trip for Cutler. Heavy changes.

A highlight for me is the Midnight Hour>Lovelight reprise. Almost like the band had forgotten that they were playing Midnight Hour and ended with the Lovelight reprise instead of finishing Midnight Hour. I sometimes wonder if perhaps Jerry simply forgot they were doing Midnight Hour when he guided them into the Lovelight reprise. Maybe out of habit perhaps? Since Pigpen rarely did Midnight Hour?

http://www.archive.org/details/gd1970-03-21.late.aud.lee.pcrp.21779.shnf

Whether or not if that is the case, it still is an interesting segue! Other than mentioning how intense the song is, and how unusual the segue, Noah does not mention just how strange a segue this really is. It is totally unique. Probably influenced by psychedelics. If you read some of the reviews by people who were there, they all claim that LSD was made available that night to the audience, compliments of The Grateful Dead's crew. The next time the Dead and the New Riders played the Capitol in June of 1970 they asked that the stage be painted purple... and it was. Jerry even wore a tye-dye purple shirt. You can see him in it in "Festival Express" or in the the picture taken 6/24/70 below:

BTW, I have YOUR blog bookmarked too LIA and enjoy reading your reviews too!

http://deadessays.blogspot.com/

I hope you keep on working at it since you are someone who loves research and sharing what you have found. Thank you! I have noticed that we are both in the habit of digging into the same eras of Grateful Dead music also. Keep it up man!


A highlight for me is the Midnight Hour>Lovelight reprise. Almost like the band had forgotten that they were playing Midnight Hour and ended with the Lovelight reprise instead of finishing Midnight Hour. I sometimes wonder if perhaps Jerry simply forgot they were doing Midnight Hour when he guided them into the Lovelight reprise. Maybe out of habit perhaps? Since Pigpen rarely did Midnight Hour? Whether or not if that is the case, it still is an interesting segue! Other than mentioning how intense the song is, and how unusual the segue, Noah does not mention just how strange a segue this really is. It is totally unique. Probably influenced by psychedelics. If you read some of the reviews by people who were there, they all claim that LSD was made available that night to the audience, compliments of The Grateful Dead's crew. The next time the Dead and the New Riders played the Capitol in June of 1970 they asked that the stage be painted purple... and it was.

http://www.archive.org/details/gd1970-03-21.late.aud.lee.pcrp.21779.sh

BTW, I have YOUR blog bookmarked too LIA and enjoy reading your reviews too!

http://deadessays.blogspot.com/

I hope you keep on working at it since you are someone who loves research and sharing what you have found. Thank you! I have noticed that we are both in the habit of digging into the same eras of Grateful Dead music also. Keep it up man!

This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2009-12-28 09:34:11

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Dec 27, 2009 11:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Yeah, that Midnight Hour is something else - it's so sweet! And that unique transition to Lovelight, wow.

I'm not sure what Noah means when he says it had been shelved - they'd done it (and these are just the shows we have) on 9/6/69, 11/2/69, 12/30/69, 1/3/70, and 2/4/70.....not VERY often, true, but enough to keep in practice!
Another very nice version followed on 6/4/70.... (And it had a few revivals in April '71, too.)
For me, the ones from 9/16/66, 11/19/66, and esp. 9/3/67 are my favorites - they really had it down in that time period...

Anyway....
My writings continue - working on a big piece now that will hopefully be ready next week.

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Dec 28, 2009 12:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

I don't know how many times I have played the moment of the Midnight Hour>Lovelight segue and just wondered:
Is it a tape flip/reel change or did Jerry really go right into Lovelight?? Sometimes it sounds like a reel flip to me & then sometimes it doesn't.. is it real, or is it Memorex??

"First there is a mountain,
Then there is no mountain,
Then there is.."

Noah probably means "shelved" as in "Midnight Hour" was a big dance hit by Wilson Pickett in 1966 and 1967, the time when the Dead were a "dance band" playing for dancers. As music went on in 1968, 1969, and 1970 the band began to move on and play it less and less. Still a great song though!

My favorites are 9/29/66, 9/3/67, 4/29/71 and 3/21/70.

This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2009-12-28 08:43:10

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Poster: Miss Divine Date: Dec 28, 2009 1:11am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

I love Noah's site, he captures the magic of each show with his lovely, flowing prose.

And this show will hopefully be the ointment to my rather worrying flu.

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Dec 28, 2009 1:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Be well darling Miss Divine.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Dec 28, 2009 5:37am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Hey SD--I thought that kind of commentary was my domain; watch out, Dan Healy might call you names.

But, I echo SD, MissD; hope you are feeling better...

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Dec 28, 2009 11:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Sorry if I was out of line Tell. Her response was so sweet, I just reacted accordingly. I find Miss Divine always very sweet. Me and her also love Gram Parsons music. No funny business intended I assure you! I am a gentleman. My grandmother, like Miss Divine, hailed from England too.

I will tell you the same thing I said to her..... Be well William Tell, and a Happy New Year to one and all! Peace be unto you all!

Dan Healy can call me any name he likes, and I will still always respect what he did for the band. Happy New Year to Dan Healy!

And do yourself a favor and listen to 3/21/70 too!

This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2009-12-29 07:55:51

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Poster: William Tell Date: Dec 29, 2009 4:40am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Oh yeah--there's room enough for all of us to appreciate her around here, and I agree completely...you do know I am joking about DHealy? Talking about the poster that said I spent too much time talking to Miss D and the other gals here? It was a joke I think now, but it was a bit unnerving at the time...and, I love all of 70!

Thanks for the kind words...

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Poster: Miss Divine Date: Dec 30, 2009 9:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

I don't mind sharing ;)

XX

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Jan 1, 2010 11:01pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Thanks Tell. I thought you felt I was being inappropriate.
I did not know if you were joking or not. Flirting with Miss Divine or whatever... she always sounds so loving & positive.. I just enjoy reading posts by especially sweet & intuitive people. Not a bad way to start the New Year..

We could use more people like that about right now..

Happy New Year!
Hau'oli Makahiki Hou!

This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2010-01-02 07:01:19

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 2, 2010 5:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Oh, I was defn joking...about a yr or so ago when Miss D was coming round here it was just a joke between us about "going to the prom" and Robthewordsmith was even going to drive the limo...I think the date is still "on", but we have toned it down a bit for fear of offending those that think it is in bad form (on my part) to play the overly attentive male role hereabouts...

I dunno--I think you hit the nail on the head; gals post differently than guys, and I think Miss D is esp sweet...so, why can't we let her know? It's not like I am going to become a stalker or some such (she and I communicated off site, so she realizes I am a little too old, and a little too respectiveful to stoop to that).

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Poster: Miss Divine Date: Dec 30, 2009 11:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Just saw something - I'm from Wales, not England.
Might sound petty but it means a lot to me.

xx

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Jan 1, 2010 11:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

I apologize!

I just thought,(being the dope that I am), that references to you on the board as being from "across the pond" meant you were from England. My mistake!

No disrespect to the Welsh intended I assure you! Forgive my mistake. I am an idiot I suppose.

Anyhow, I love your input on the board and also appreciate the fact that you have stated that you love some of the same musicians and singers I also listen to, like the Grateful Dead & Gram Parsons!

For any differences any of us might have, music is what is supposed to unite us here, no matter where we come from! I would bet that we could have a glass of wine (or whatever), and listen to "The Gilded Palace Of Sin", or "Return Of The Grievous Angel", "GP" or "American Beauty" and feel the same thing. Great music!


Aloha Nui Loa!

This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2010-01-02 07:32:15

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Poster: Miss Divine Date: Jan 2, 2010 5:30am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

No problems SD, a lot of people don't even realise that Wales and England are sepaerate countries (although, we are a principality to be totally correct)

xx

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 2, 2010 5:58am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

We Irish feel a kindred spirit for the Welsh, and the Scots, but most similarly the Welsh, since all three of "us" represent the areas subjugated at one time or another by Rob and his brethren to the South...or east in our case. Also, we share the same heritage of forced/coerced military overseas service in which regiments were often groups of individuals of similar background (BlWatch, and my fav, the Welsh 24th Foot [though some like to point our a number of "foreigners" were therein] of Zulu fame).

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Jan 2, 2010 6:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: robthesubjugator

"...subjugated at one time or another by Rob and his brethren to the South..."

Excuse me?

Is this some other 'Rob' with whom you've become acquainted in my absence?

And there's a hand my trusty fiere,
And gie's a hand o thine,
And we'll tak a right guid-willie waught,
For auld lang syne

Happy New Year, WT.

RobtheproudlyScottishwordsmith

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 2, 2010 6:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: robthesubjugator

I knew that'd get your attention! I of course only lump you insensitively due solely to geography at this time...I will note however that some Scots (like some Welsh and some Irish) did (ironically) assist the original anglo saxon dogs in furthering the expansion at the expense of their former neighbors and kinfolks, but alas, such is the way of humankind methinks!

And a big fat Happy New Year right back my friend! Assume you heard about the joy that joined us to ease Wyatt's passing, if the powers that be will pardon yet another facebook moment on my part. May this new year bring only success and enjoyment as you tackle your two new projects!

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 2, 2010 5:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Just a slip of the...hmmm, okay, knowing everyone around here, I am going to skip that phrase, and just say, SD didn't know.

Of course, we Irish would never make that mistake as we still do our math 26 + 6 = 1...

So, did you hear our news about having a Cardigan Welsh Corgi now too? Sadly, we lost Wyatt, the Pembroke...

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Poster: Miss Divine Date: Jan 2, 2010 5:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Sorry to hear of your loss, but great that you have a new arrival.

XX

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Poster: Miss Divine Date: Dec 28, 2009 9:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

Thanks both.
I'm feeling a bit better but I've been ill all Xmas.

XX

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Dec 28, 2009 10:21pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: 3-21-70 review

The Grateful Dead at the Capitol Theatre, Port Chester NY, 1970:

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